Repair a torn nail

repair a torn nail

Next time you snap a nail, don’t panic. There are some tricks you can use to fix the damage. Tearing or tearing off a nail hurts, but your look doesn’t have to suffer. Never let a broken nail spoil a special event again.

Fix the nail

Wash your hands or feet.

Before you can repair the nail, you need to make sure that your hands and possibly your feet are clean and free of grease. Wash your hands and/or feet with warm water and soap. Dry them thoroughly with a clean towel. Be careful as you wash and dry yourself, so you don’t hook behind the torn nail and worsen the situation.

Cut a strip of nail repair material.

If you have a special nail repair kit, use the tissue strip from the kit to do this and cut a piece large enough to cover the entire nail and fold it over at the nail tip. If you don’t have access to a nail repair kit, you can cut a suitable piece out of a tea bag. This is the most common replacement and works quite well. If you don’t have home nail repair tissue or tea bags, you can try a cotton handkerchief or coffee filters. The material must be at least large enough to cover the entire crack. However, it would be ideal if the material is large enough that something protrudes when the entire nail is covered.

Attach the repair material.

Put a small blob of super glue or nail glue on your nail. Use the tip of the applicator to gently spread the glue so it covers the entire nail. Use tweezers to place the trimmed material onto the glue-covered nail. If you’re using a nail repair kit, use the nail repair liquid instead of the glue and apply it with the brush with the kit. Use the tweezers to smooth out any bumps or wrinkles in the material. It should be as smooth as possible. If necessary, use small nail scissors or regular scissors to trim off any excess material.

Fold the material over at the tip of the nail.

Use the tweezers to pinch the excess material at the tip of the nail so that it folds over and sticks to the bottom of the nail. If the material doesn’t already have glue, you may need to apply a small bead of glue or repair fluid to help it stick to the bottom of the nail. This measure serves as additional support and protection for the broken/torn nail.

Apply another layer of glue to the material.

Put extra glue on the material, now covering your nail and spreading it with the glue tip. Make the surface as smooth as possible. Nail repair liquid can also be used instead of superglue or nail glue.

Cut and polish the nail.

If you have a buffing block, gently buff the nail once the glue is dry. Use the smoothing side first, then the polishing side. For better results, you should only move the polishing block in one direction instead of back and forth.

Apply a top coat to the entire nail.

Apply a coat of top coat or nail hardener to the damaged nail to give it extra support and final protection. It’s a good idea to let the glue dry overnight before performing this step to prevent any bubbles or unevenness from forming. You can paint the nail with a colored polish once the top coat has dried.

Perform a temporary repair

Cut a small strip of clear duct tape.

Use scissors to carefully trim a small strip of tape slightly larger than the tear. Use nail scissors or sewing scissors to make it easier to trim the tape without having to peel it laboriously off the scissor blade. If you’re using larger scissors, try to trim the tape with just the tip of the scissors. Opt for a single-sided tape with weak adhesion. Consider Scotch® matte tape, scotch tape, multipurpose tape, or other clear office supply tape. Avoid sticky tape like electrical tape.

Cover the entire tear with a strip of tape.

Stick the center of the tape over the center of the tear. Press it firmly onto your nail to hold it in place. Then run the tip of a healthy nail in both directions over the entire strip of tape to completely cover the tear. Make sure both sides of the tear are flat against each other before pressing the tape down. Apply firm, even pressure to the tape to secure it to the nail. Press the tape in the direction of the tear, never in the opposite direction. Pushing it in the opposite direction can cause the nail to tear even more.

Cut off excess tape.

If the tape sticking to your nail is too big, use nail scissors or sewing scissors to trim off the excess. Ensure the adhesive strip is flat on the nail at both ends. If you don’t have small scissors, you can use the tips of regular-sized scissors to trim the tape.

Fix the nail as soon as possible.

Although this repair is sufficient to save the nail in an emergency, it is no longer a long-term solution. You still need to properly fix the nail with stronger glue and a more thorough method. In the meantime, be extra careful not to catch anything with the tape or the nail underneath.

Be very careful when removing the adhesive strip.

Make sure you peel the tape in the direction of the tear, not the opposite.

Use nail glue

Wash your hands or feet.

Before you can repair the nail, you need to make sure that your hands and possibly your feet are clean and free of grease. Wash your hands and/or feet with warm water and soap. Dry them thoroughly with a clean towel. Be careful as you wash and dry yourself, so you don’t hook behind the torn nail and worsen the situation.

Soak the torn nail in warm water.

If the tip of your nail is completely broken off and you want to reattach it, you will need to soak the broken nail tip in warm water until it becomes pliable again. You can skip this step if your nail hasn’t completely snapped off or is still bendable.

Apply nail glue to the torn nail.

Gently squeeze the tube of nail glue until a small drop of glue comes out. Take this drop of glue on a toothpick and spread it on one side of the broken nail to cover it with a thin layer of glue. If you don’t have nail glue handy, use super glue. In general, adhesives containing cyanoacrylate have the greatest adhesive power. Under no circumstances touch the adhesive with your fingers.

Repair and fix the nail.

Use the tip of the toothpick to snap the torn portion of your nail back into its original position. Use one side of the toothpick to apply firm, even pressure to the nail. Here, too, no glue must get on your fingers. Press down on the nail for at least a minute to make sure it’s properly bonded.

Wipe off excess glue.

Dip a cotton swab or ball in nail polish remover and run the soaked cotton along the side of your nail bed before the glue dries completely. This should remove any excess glue from your skin. You may have to rub a little harder to remove the glue. Make sure to clean any areas of skin glued with nail polish remover.

Smooth the repaired area.

File the nail smooth once the glue is completely dry. To do this, use the coarse side of a polishing block or nail file to smooth down the rough, exposed edges of the crack. Only move the file in one direction, not back and forth. To minimize the risk of additional damage, you should only move the file toward the crack and not against it. Go slowly to avoid additional damage to the nail.

After drying, apply a protective top coat.

Once the torn nail is smooth again, protect it by applying a coat of nail hardener or protective top coat to the entire nail. Then let the nail dry completely.

Repair a broken nail

Remove the torn nail.

If a nail, or part of a nail, is completely torn from the nail bed, you may need to remove the nail to treat the injury. Use nail scissors to remove any areas that have partially come loose and use tweezers to lift the nail out. Removing the nail will give you better access to the injured nail bed beneath it. As a result, you can better care for the area and thus reduce the risk of infection. Alternatively, you could leave the detached nail in the nail bed and clean around it. This is more difficult but possible. The detached nail will later fall off on its own once the new nail has grown out far enough.

Stop the bleeding

Depending on how much of the nail is torn off, your nail bed may bleed profusely. Therefore, before you can continue treatment, you must stop the bleeding by applying pressure to the wound. If possible, use medical gauze or sterile compresses. Place the gauze or compress on the wound and press firmly for a few minutes. Use even pressure to do this.

Trim any remaining nail pieces short.

Use nail clippers or sharp nail scissors to cut off any torn or sharp edges. You should do this regardless of whether you removed the torn nail or left it in the nail bed to prevent further snagging and tearing. Contact your doctor and have him/her trim your nail if it hurts too much or you’re uncomfortable doing it yourself.

Soak your foot or hand in cold water.

After trimming your nail, you should immediately chill the injured nail bed in a bowl of cold water for 20 minutes. The water should be cold enough to soothe and slightly numb the affected area. Soaking your injured toe or finger in cold water will help regulate blood flow to that area of ​​your body.

Soak your foot or hand in salt water.

After the cold water treatment, you should switch to warm salt water. Add a teaspoon of salt to a liter of water. Soak your injured finger or toe in salt water for 20 minutes. The salt water helps keep the wound from becoming infected. Repeat this process twice a day for the first three days. Pat the injured area dry with a clean, soft cotton rag.

Apply an antiseptic ointment.

To further speed up the healing process and reduce the risk of infection, you should gently rub the entire area with iodine ointment using a disinfected finger or a clean cotton ball. Make sure your hands are always clean when dressing a wound.

Cover the nail bed until the new nail grows back.

Put a band-aid on the injured nail bed to prevent further snagging and reduce the risk of infection. Protect your nail bed with a band-aid until the new nail has grown enough to cover the entire nail bed. Change the band-aid every time you bathe or clean the wound. Make sure the wound is always dry when applying the patch. Also, reapply the patch if it gets wet.

Watch the wound.

Every time you change patches, check for signs of inflammation. This is especially important during the first 72 hours, but you should generally continue to do so until the nail has grown enough to cover the exposed nail bed. Signs of possible inflammation include fever, redness, increased heat in the wound area, pain, tenderness, swelling, and pus. If you suspect an infection, make an appointment with your doctor.